Illustration

Accessibility

What is accessibility?

Accessibility in UX design refers to the practice of designing digital products, such as websites and mobile applications, that can be used by people with a wide range of abilities. This includes designing for people with visual, auditory, motor, and cognitive impairments, as well as for older users.

Good accessibility in UX design involves making sure that digital products are easy to use, navigate, and understand for everyone, regardless of their abilities. To achieve this, designers may use a variety of techniques and best practices, such as:

  • Providing text alternatives for non-text content, such as images and videos
  • Using clear and simple language
  • Providing clear and consistent navigation
  • Allowing users to adjust the size and color of text to suit their needs
  • Supporting keyboard-only navigation for users who cannot use a mouse
  • And providing clear and informative error messages.

Additionally, Accessibility guidelines, such as WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines), are also important to follow in order to make sure that a product is inclusive and accessible to everyone.

By considering accessibility throughout the design process, rather than as an afterthought, designers can create products that are not only compliant with regulations but are also more inclusive, usable and beneficial to a wider range of users.

What are the different types of accessibility?

There are several different types of accessibility that are commonly considered in UX design, each of which addresses the needs of a different group of users with disabilities. Some of the main types of accessibility include:

  • Visual accessibility: This involves designing products that can be used by people with visual impairments, such as those who are blind or have low vision. This includes providing text alternatives for non-text content, using high contrast between text and background, and allowing users to adjust the size and color of text.
  • Auditory accessibility: This involves designing products that can be used by people who are deaf or hard of hearing. This includes providing captioning and subtitles for videos, and providing audio descriptions for images.
  • Motor accessibility: This involves designing products that can be used by people with motor impairments, such as those who have difficulty using a mouse or keyboard. This includes allowing users to navigate using just a keyboard and supporting larger touch targets for users with limited fine motor control.
  • Cognitive accessibility: This involves designing products that can be used by people with cognitive impairments, such as those with ADHD, autism, or dementia. This includes using clear and simple language, providing clear and consistent navigation, and providing clear and informative error messages.
  • Age-related accessibility: This involves designing products that can be used by older adults, as they may have different needs and abilities than younger users. This includes larger font sizes, higher contrast, and allowing users to adjust font-size and color to their preference.

It's worth noting that many users have multiple disabilities, so it's important to design products that are inclusive of multiple types of accessibility to cater to all users with different needs. Also, there are other types of accessibility such as, language accessibility, that cater to non-native speakers, and cultural accessibility that cater to different cultures.

How is accessibility used in UX design?

In the field of user experience (UX) design, accessibility refers to the practice of designing products, services, and environments that can be used by as many people as possible, including those with disabilities.

There are many different ways that UX designers can incorporate accessibility into their design process. Here are a few examples:

  1. Design for visual impairments: This can include using high-contrast color schemes, providing alternative text for images, and designing for screen readers.
  2. Design for mobility impairments: This can include designing user interfaces that can be easily operated with a keyboard or voice control, and designing physical environments that are easy to navigate.
  3. Design for cognitive impairments: This can include using clear and simple language, providing clear and consistent navigation, and designing for predictability.

By considering the needs of people with disabilities at every stage of the design process, UX designers can create products and services that are usable and accessible to a wider range of people.

How to improve your accessibility skills?

There are several steps you can take to improve your accessibility design skills:

  1. Learn about the principles of accessibility: Familiarize yourself with the principles of accessibility, such as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
  2. Understand the needs of people with disabilities: It is important to understand the needs and challenges faced by people with disabilities, as well as the assistive technologies they use.
  3. Use accessibility tools and testing: There are many tools and resources available to help you design and test your products for accessibility. These may include screen readers, color contrast analyzers, and automated testing tools.
  4. Seek feedback from people with disabilities: One of the best ways to improve your accessibility design skills is to seek feedback from people with disabilities. This can help you understand their experiences and identify areas where your designs can be improved.
  5. Participate in communities and events focused on accessibility: There are many communities and events focused on accessibility, such as meetups, conferences, and online forums. Participating in these can help you learn from others and stay up-to-date on the latest developments in accessibility design.
  6. Continuously improve your skills: Accessibility is a constantly evolving field, and it is important to continuously improve your skills and stay up-to-date on the latest best practices. This may involve taking courses, reading articles and blogs, or participating in online communities focused on accessibility.

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